Tract 29 – Wetland/Floodplain Restoration Project:

       In our ongoing planning efforts to improve water quality in our Lakes, the Hideout initiated a large scale project back in 2012 to restore a relic wetland/floodplain that had been

Tract 29Previously channelized and that had lost its effectiveness to slow and filter incoming runoff from Lake Ariel and the surrounding watershed.
In coordination with the State and the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the Hideout developed a plan with support of their expert Lakes consultant, Princeton Hydro, to design and implement the project.  The Hideout was recognized for this forward thinking initiative and was awarded a $76,000 Growing Greener grant by the State.

North Beach, Shoreline Restoration Project:

Ongoing shoreline erosion at our North Beach amenity had reached a point of threatening existing and beautiful pine trees, disrupting beach activities and contributing toward increased nutrient load into the Lake.  In partnership with the Lake Wallenpaupack Watershed Management District (LWWMD), the Hideout was able to seek and obtain approval for its first ever grant (PALMS) of $20,000 towards the cost of repairing and restoring the Lake shoreline.

Deerfield Lake Dredging Project, 2013:

         Over the years, accumulation of sediment, particularly in the northern section of the Lake, had reduced the overall depth and usage of the lake.
With shallower water depths, along with increased nutrients from the sediment, an explosion of submerged aquatic vegetation developed that had reached a level of significantly impeding recreational activities in the Lake.
In 2013, the Hideout initiated its first ever hydraulic dredging project.  Sediment material, along with submerged aquatic vegetation, was removed and the lake depth was increased from 1-3 feet in that section.  Since this project was completed, recreational/non-powered boat use has increased substantially and overall lake water quality and aesthetics has been improved.

Fisheries:

            The Hideout supports and monitors fish survey population data that is conducted periodically so as to assess overall fish population, species, health and habitat.  From this information, the Hideout performs strategic stocking of fish in our lakes: Roamingwood; Deerfield; and Brooks Lake.