Roamingwood Lake (198 acres)


Roamingwood Lake is Mesotrophic in nature with a normal surface elevation of 1324 feet above sea level. The earthen embankment dam is 32 feet high, 400 feet long and was re-armored in 2010 to prevent overtopping. The lake undergoes a yearly drawdown event of between 5 and 10 feet as is permitted by PA Fish and Boat Commission, usually after Columbus Day lasting well into the spring months so as to prevent shoreline erosion as well as ice damage to bulkheads and docks.

Water enters into Roamingwood Lake from a variety of sources, namely from Lake Ariel (not owned by The Hideout), Brooks Lake, Deerfield Lake, Windemere Lake, Wildwood Lake (not owned by The Hideout) and several streams/tributaries.

Water discharges from Roamingwood Lake into Ariel creek, then into the Entrance Pond. Water continues flowing downstream into Lake Genero (not owned by The Hideout), continuing into Ariel Creek until eventually making its way into Lake Wallenpaupack.

A stainless-steel carp barrier will be replacing an older barrier system around the outlet structure of the lake in Spring 2019 to prevent stocked Triploid Grass Carp from making their way downstream. Triploid Grass Carp are quite large and feed on aquatic vegetation, and may not be harvested by fishermen.

The average depth of Roamingwood Lake is 6 feet, however, the deepest portion is close to 17 feet in depth. Boulders are a typical feature along the shoreline and safety buoys are placed so as to warn boaters of underwater or partially submerged rock hazards. Boaters are encouraged to take extra precautions when operating their boats around the shoreline.

Boaters wishing to utilize Roamingwood Lake should review and familiarize themselves with all Lake/Marina Rules. Non-powered boats are welcome on Roamingwood Lake. Please ensure the boats display proper and current registration stickers from The Hideout Recreation Department. All non-powered boats are to be operated within the buoy markers along the shoreline.


Please be advised that ice fishing is not allowed on any Hideout lakes.

If you wish to engage in fishing activities, please note that​ all adults must display a current PA Fishing License

Roamingwood is routinely patrolled and monitored by the PA Fish and Boat Commission. The following Rules/Regs apply for the taking of fish on this particular lake. Open fishery to harvest fish per PA Fish and Boat Commission Regulations but recommend catch and release. Follow state guidelines with the following exceptions:
  • Use of Alewife and Golden Shiners for bait are prohibited
  • Bass- Cut state limits in half. Therefore:
    • Jan 1 – Apr 17 and Nov 1 – Dec 31: 15”, 2 (combined species)
    • Apr 18 – Jun 12: NO HARVEST
    • Jun 13 – Oct 31: 12”, 3 (combined species)
    • Walleye- NO HARVEST (year round)
    • Grass Carp – NO HARVEST (year round)
    • A fine of $125.00 per fish not immediately returned to the water will be imposed for failure to comply

Roamingwood Lake is home to many different species of fish, but is routinely stocked with Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Hybrid Striped Bass, and Crappie.

The Hideout invests much time and effort into preserving and enhancing the quality of all our water bodies. During the summer months, aquatic vegetation and algae are controlled with safe aquatic herbicide applications. Additionally, the water around each of the two designated swimming areas, as well as the main marina area, are tested weekly by an outside company to ensure safe swimming conditions exist and that results for Escherichia coli conform to applicable accreditation standards.

A shoreline stabilization and enhancement project occurred in 2013 near the North Beach area thanks to a Pennsylvania Lake Management Society (PALMS) Grant.
Lastly, The Hideout, as part of our rolling 5 year Lakes Management Plan, has been exploring the potential need to address sediment points, particularly shallow areas, and rock hazards within the lake and its multiple coves though selective dredging.


Brooks Lake (9.2 acres)


 
The embankment dam structure for Brooks Lake is 8 feet high, 500 feet in length, and it maintains a normal pool of 53 acre-feet of water.

The average water depth is 5 feet and the lake underwent a successful dredging event in the Fall of 2017 when previously, the average water depth was only 3 feet. 
Boaters wishing to utilize Brooks Lake should note that only electric motors are to be utilized. Non-powered boats are welcome on Brooks Lake.
Please ensure the boats display proper and current registration stickers from The Hideout Recreation Department.

Please review and familiarize yourself with Lake Rules/Regs.

Please be advised that ice fishing is not allowed on any Hideout lakes.

If you wish to engage in fishing activities, please note that all adults must display a current PA Fishing License

Brooks Lake is routinely patrolled and monitored by the PA Fish and Boat Commission. The following Rules/Regs apply for the taking of fish on this particular lake. Open fishery to harvest fish per PA Fish and Boat Commission Regulations but recommend catch and release. Follow state guidelines with the following exceptions:
  • Use of Alewife and Golden Shiners for bait are prohibited
  • Hybrid Striped Bass - NO HARVEST
  • A fine of $125.00 per fish not immediately returned to the water will be imposed for failure to comply
Located just on the other side of the Brooks Lake embankment dam is a wetland area/floodplain known as Tract 29 (8.5 acres). In 2012, the goal was to restore this relic that had previously been channelized and had lost its effectiveness to slow and filter incoming runoff from Lake Ariel as well as the surrounding watershed. In coordination with the State, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE), and Princeton Hydro, a plan was developed to design and implement the rehabilitation and expansion of this area. The Hideouts forward thinking initiative resulted in being awarded a $76,050 Growing Greener Grant by the State of Pennsylvania.
The Lake Wallenpaupack Watershed Management District sponsored the grant while experts with Princeton Hydro focused on improving the ecosystem as a whole.

Established in 2014, Tract 29 possessed greater than 85% vegetative cover and almost 85% survivorship of woody plant material. Tract 29 aids in removing and processing nutrients, sediment, and other pollutants from Ariel Creek prior to reaching Roamingwood Lake, reducing Total Phosphorous (TP) and Total Suspended Solids (TSS).

A 2017 monitoring inspection yielded results that vegetative cover within both the low floodplain and high floodplain of Tract 29 was at 98.3% (well above the original 85% threshold)

The goal established by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) for this wetland enhancement project to be deemed a success stipulated that the wetland possess at least 85% vegetative cover and a minimum of 85% survivorship of the woody plant material installed after a period of 5 years. After five years, the project site currently, in 2018, possesses vegetative coverage well in excess of that threshold (93.5% low floodplain, 100% high floodplain). Additionally, survivorship of installed woody plant material exceeds the 85% survivorship threshold, currently 89.0% (219/246)
Similar to Deerfield Lake, Brooks Lake has an aeration system to keep the quality of the water optimal throughout the summer seasons. For Spring 2019, a brand new aeration system will be getting installed.
To help offset algae growth during the summer months, which often stems from elevated levels of TP (Total Phosporous), Brooks Lake receives annual treatments of a product called PhosLock. This treatment is used on other bodies of water within The Hideout and causes no harm to the fishery or the water, but actually improves it. Occasionally, it may be necessary to bring in a large aquatic harvester known as a Truxor that mechanically removes thick concentrations of filamentous and mat algae from around docks. 


Deerfield Lake (23.6 acres)


Deerfield Lakes earthen embankment dam is 11.5 feet high and 800 feet in length. It has a normal pool of 90-acre feet of water and the lake rests within the Ariel Creek subwatershed, which is designated as a High Quality (HQ), Cold Water Fishery (CWF) and located in HUC 02040103-Lackawaxen. The lakes normal water surface elevation is 1,406 feet above sea level.

The Hideout initiated its first ever hydraulic dredging event in 2013 with Deerfield Lake, which increased average depths between 1-3 feet throughout the lake. Average water depth here is 5.4 feet with the deepest spot in the lake being 14.1 feet.

To control aquatic vegetation, Deerfield Lake receives routine applications of PhosLock and site visits of a mechanical harvester known as a Truxor by outside agencies. A large portion of the land that drains into the main inlet of Deerfield Lake is retired farmland, not owned by The Hideout, which can be associated for historically high levels of elevated Total Phosphorous (TP) concentrations.

To help reduce the amount of TP and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) entering into Deerfield Lake, The Hideout was awarded with a Growing Greener Grant of $123,910.00 to install a Nutrient Separating Baffle Box (NSBB) at the northern most end of the lake.
This device will remove between 13 and 44 pounds of TP a year (an increase of 70-80%) and between 42,000 and 48,000 pounds of TSS per year.The install date for this project is 2019.

An aeration pump shack is located at the northern end of the lake, near the boat launch area. A new vertex aeration system was installed in 2017 and visitors will notice areas of the lake with oxygen bubbles coming up. These are intentional and are intended to increase the dissolved oxygen content within the lake to further improve fisheries quality.

In the wintertime, water is pumped from Deerfield Lake down to the Ski Hill to provide water for their snow making machines. If you are skiing at The Hideout, then you can thank Deerfield Lake for the majority of the snow!
Boaters wishing to utilize Deerfield Lake should note that only electric motors are to be utilized.

Please review and familiarize yourself with Lake Rules/Regs. Non-powered boats are welcome on Deerfield Lake. Please ensure the boats display proper and current registration stickers from The Hideout Recreation Department.

Please be advised that ice fishing is not allowed on any Hideout lakes.

If you wish to engage in fishing activities, please note that all adults must display a current PA Fishing License:


Fishermen interested in seeing the depths of Deerfield Lake as of Fall 2018 should Click Here.

Deerfield Lake is routinely patrolled and monitored by the PA Fish and Boat Commission. The following Rules/Regs apply for the taking of fish on this particular lake. Open fishery to harvest fish per PA Fish and Boat Commission Regulations but recommend catch and release. Follow state guidelines with the following exceptions:
  • Use of Alewife and Golden Shiners for bait are prohibited.
  • Grass Carp – NO HARVEST
  • A fine of $125.00 per fish not immediately returned to the water will be imposed for failure to comply
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